We're about eight months out from the launch of the new HP PageWide A3 color MFP's.  I thought now would be a good time to share thoughts on how to beat the PageWide technology.  Let's put our heads together and see what we can come up with!

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Original Post

ok, I got more. Is anyone else going to chime?  What I'm doing is researching the heck out of the HP PageWide XL printers. It makes sense because the same print technology will be used in the new A3 color MFP's.  Thus, I'm taking some of the data that I find interesting and posting it up for us.

1) Light radiation hazard

Light radiation is emitted from the beacon, ink level indicators, paper drawer indicators, and formatter status indicators. The emitted light is in compliance with the requirements of the exempt group of IEC 62471:2006, Photobiological safety of lamps and lamp systems. Do not modify these modules.

  • Here's some additional information I found on this:  Photobiological Safety of Lamps and Lamp Systems (IEC/EN 62471) for LEDs. My thoughts....., there is no good radiation.
  • Evaluating the photobiological safety of lamps and lamp systems, including LEDs, to IEC/EN 62471 is a legal requirement for lighting products sold in Europe. Photobiological testing relates to the optical radiation effects of LED and traditional lighting on human eyes. As LEDs become widely used, assessment of the unique “blue light” hazard is critical. The Photobiological Safety of Lamps and Lamp Systems (IEC/EN 62471) for LED Lighting white paper provides an overview of exposure limits, measurement techniques, classification of hazards, and manufacturer obligations including labeling requirements.

    Only for HP PageWide XL devices:

  • Heavy paper hazard

     Special care must be taken to avoid personal injury when handling heavy rolls of paper.

    1.   Handling heavy rolls may require more than one person. Care must be taken to avoid back strain and/or injury.  
    2. Consider using a forklift, pallet truck, or other handling equipment.
    3. When handling heavy rolls, wear personal protective equipment including boots and gloves. 
    4. Do not exceed the maximum weight of a paper roll: see Functional specifications on page 128.
    5. Paper rolls could weigh up to 18 kg (50 lbs). Follow your local Environmental Health and Safety recommendations for handling heavy paper rolls.

      Ink handling (This is interesting!!)

      HP recommends that you wear gloves when handling the ink maintenance cartridge or waste container.

I agree:
Print quality will be poor compared to laser on normal paper
CPP will higher, maintenance is expensive on PW devices
And also the ink is not good for you (the enviroment) This is true for many other HP ink jet printers
I am convinced that we will see similar devices from other manufactures, I know Ricoh has done a lot of research in ink technology lately 

Art Post posted:

ok, I got more. Is anyone else going to chime?  What I'm doing is researching the heck out of the HP PageWide XL printers. It makes sense because the same print technology will be used in the new A3 color MFP's.  Thus, I'm taking some of the data that I find interesting and posting it up for us.

1) Light radiation hazard

Light radiation is emitted from the beacon, ink level indicators, paper drawer indicators, and formatter status indicators. The emitted light is in compliance with the requirements of the exempt group of IEC 62471:2006, Photobiological safety of lamps and lamp systems. Do not modify these modules.

  • Here's some additional information I found on this:  Photobiological Safety of Lamps and Lamp Systems (IEC/EN 62471) for LEDs. My thoughts....., there is no good radiation.
  • Evaluating the photobiological safety of lamps and lamp systems, including LEDs, to IEC/EN 62471 is a legal requirement for lighting products sold in Europe. Photobiological testing relates to the optical radiation effects of LED and traditional lighting on human eyes. As LEDs become widely used, assessment of the unique “blue light” hazard is critical. The Photobiological Safety of Lamps and Lamp Systems (IEC/EN 62471) for LED Lighting white paper provides an overview of exposure limits, measurement techniques, classification of hazards, and manufacturer obligations including labeling requirements.

    Only for HP PageWide XL devices:

  • Heavy paper hazard

     Special care must be taken to avoid personal injury when handling heavy rolls of paper.

    1.   Handling heavy rolls may require more than one person. Care must be taken to avoid back strain and/or injury.  
    2. Consider using a forklift, pallet truck, or other handling equipment.
    3. When handling heavy rolls, wear personal protective equipment including boots and gloves. 
    4. Do not exceed the maximum weight of a paper roll: see Functional specifications on page 128.
    5. Paper rolls could weigh up to 18 kg (50 lbs). Follow your local Environmental Health and Safety recommendations for handling heavy paper rolls.

      Ink handling (This is interesting!!)

      HP recommends that you wear gloves when handling the ink maintenance cartridge or waste container.

Let's talk more about the paper.  The HP will take a 650 foot roll.  What that means is the roll of paper will be 50lbs or more.  

* Risk of someone hurting their back when loaded the paper. This is introduces additional risk to the business owner if someone hurts their back when changing rolls of paper. The last thing a business owner needs is a workman's comp claim.

* Are the prints going to be used on a job site? If so, rain and or moisture can make the ink smear and bleed. What good are the prints then?

I saw the 8000 in action at a commercial "blueprint" shop and it was very impressive.  The quality on 20 lb bond was great, and very fast. The guys running the machine said operational costs were significantly less than the KIPs they replaced it with. And very reliable...I believe they ran 1.5 million sq ft without a problem.  They replaced the cutter on their own, pretty easily.  I'm exclusively a Ricoh WF dealer, but these things scare me due to the loss of service/parts revenue  I would incur if I needed to place one.  Yes, the size/weight is a detriment, and predicting ink cost is always tricky.  But it appears this technology may have some legs to stand on.

 

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